Regional Migration Forecast: 23-30 September 2016

by cnkguy
Regional Migration Forecast: 23-30 September 2016

Regional Migration Forecast: 23-30 September 2016

23 September, 2016
White-throated Sparrow. Jay McGowan/Macaulay Library. eBird S31628294
White-throated Sparrow. Jay McGowan/Macaulay Library. eBird S31628294

Continental Summary
Favorable conditions for widespread light to moderate migration featuring Greater White-fronted Goose, Northern Shoveler, Eared Grebe, Red-tailed Hawk, Townsend’s Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, and White-crowned Sparrow come to the West during the first half of the forecast period, while the East experiences several bouts of favorable migration conditions with moderate to locally very heavy flights of Pied-billed Grebe, Turkey Vulture, Franklin’s Gull, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Gray Catbird, Ovenbird, Tennessee Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, and White-throated Sparrow.

Play/Pause

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Arrows show wind speed and direction (arrow points in the direction to which wind is blowing) 100 m above ground level. Areas with southerly winds are colored red; northerly winds colored blue. Accumulated precipitation (in 6 hour intervals) is green, outlined by white. Broadly speaking, areas of the map in blue will experience conditions that are favorable for migration, and areas where blue and green (and red and blue) intersect and overlap may experience migrant concentrations and fallouts as migrants interact with precipitation.

We use data collected by eBird users help make more accurate forecasts. If you enjoy the predictions contained in these posts, please consider submitting your own bird sightings to eBird to even further improve the content. Every observation counts, whether it be a single bird at a feeder in your backyard, or an entire day spent in a national park. To get started with eBird, head on over to the site!

Additionally, please note that photographs and other digital media showing birds come from the Macaulay Library, which receives credit along with the photographer/observer in the media caption as part of a new initiative that allows public contribution, access and use of natural history media.

Need a review of our definitions for regions, species on the move, and migration amounts? Please visit this link.

Quick Links to Regions
Upper Midwest and NortheastBirdCast Upper Midwest and Northeast Region Gulf Coast and SoutheastBirdCast Upper Southeast Region
Great Plainsbirdcast_plains West
BirdCast West Region

Upper Midwest and Northeast
Moderate to locally very heavy flights will be widespread over the weekend, gradually becoming more restricted to coastal areas and New England by Sunday night. Conditions for morning flights in New England and the Canadian Maritimes, in particular, should have birders prepared to visit their favorite coastal sites on Sunday or Monday depending on the timing of strong winds forecast in the area (if strong winds come at night, go birding in the morning!). These conditions coincide with the offshore passage of the remnants of Karl and a shift in North Atlantic winds (see below). As a disturbance shuts down flights by Monday and Tuesday to the east of the Great Lakes and Appalachians, a new round of marginal and favorable conditions follow and bring more moderate to heavy flights. After first occurring in the Midwest, this new pulse of movements reaches the greatest extents on Wednesday night but continues in many areas through Thursday night. Note, also, that a favorable pattern of easterly flow across the North Atlantic will be in place late this weekend – as is usually the case with such flow, birders in the Canadian Maritimes and New England should be watchful in the coming week for European surprises . . .

Pine Warbler. Bob Edelen/Macaulay Library. eBird S31694160
Pine Warbler. Bob Edelen/Macaulay Library. eBird S31694160

Species on the Move
Beginning Arrivals What is this?
Peaking Arrivals
Beginning Departures
Ending Departures

Gulf Coast and Southeast
A patchwork of favorable migration conditions, mostly east of the Mississippi River, will bring locally moderate to heavy flights to kick off the weekend. More widespread favorable conditions for more extensive moderate to heavy flights arrive on Monday and Tuesday, continuing mostly through the end of the period. Note that precipitation is forecast and will likely interact with these flights, particularly in parts of Texas and Florida. Birders should watch the distributions of these interactions and overlaps between birds and precipitation for local concentrations and fallouts.

Gray Catbird. Bob Edelen/Macaulay Library. eBird S31714763
Gray Catbird. Bob Edelen/Macaulay Library. eBird S31714763

Beginning Arrivals What is this?
Peaking Arrivals
Beginning Departures
Ending Departures

Great Plains
Unfavorable conditions begin the weekend, as a frontal boundary arrives in the region. However, the end of the weekend brings a marked change, with widespread favorable conditions for moderate to very heavy flights across the Plains. This burst of activity will be reasonably short-lived, as southerly flow returns by early in the work week, keeping many more birds grounded. But the northern Plains will continue to experience locally moderate flights into the end of the period. Note also that Sunday and Monday will be excellent days for observing diurnal migration, so pick your favorite skywatching spot for a long visit!

Ruby-crowned Kinglet. Yves Dugré/Macaulay Library. eBird S31703824
Ruby-crowned Kinglet. Yves Dugré/Macaulay Library. eBird S31703824

Species on the Move
Beginning Arrivals What is this?
Peaking Arrivals
Beginning Departures
Ending Departures

West
Widespread favorable conditions for migration reach their peak for the forecast period on Saturday night, bringing moderate to locally heavy flights to many areas east of the Rockies and moderate flights to many areas west of the Rockies. As the work week begins, less favorable southerly flow builds, particularly in the northern half of the region, while slightly more favorable conditions along the Pacific coast and Desert Southwest allow light to moderate movements to continue locally in these areas. Wednesday and Thursday nights see this pattern reverse, with more favorable conditions for light to moderate flights move north. Note, Sunday should be a particularly good day for skywatching along the eastern front of the Rockies.

Townsend’s Warbler. Brad Singer/Macaulay Library. eBird S31643465
Townsend’s Warbler. Brad Singer/Macaulay Library. eBird S31643465

Species on the Move
Beginning Arrivals What is this?
Peaking Arrivals
Beginning Departures
Ending Departures
–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Farnsworth and Van Doren

Source: Learn about Canaries and Budgies plus find more info about Budgie food and Canary Food. BIRDS and BIRDS NEWS All About Birds


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More Plants Bring More Resources for Wildlife and Positive Changes to the Environment

by cnkguy
More Plants Bring More Resources for Wildlife and Positive Changes to the Environment

Abundant Plants, Abundant Wildlife
Becca Rodomsky-Bish September 21, 2016
Birds Healthy Ecosystems Native Plants Other Wildlife Pollinators
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Increasing the area covered by plants in your yard or community has many benefits for you and wildlife. This is a foundational theme in our work at Habitat Network where we consistently advocate for more areas to be landscaped with plant-life to increase access for wildlife, like this Monarch caterpillar enjoying Whorled Milkweed (Asclepias verticillata) in a native flower bed.

Louisville Waterfront Park in Louisville, Kentucky.
The positive impacts of increasing plant cover include, but are not limited to, more efficient stormwater management by decreasing impervious hardscapes through bioswales or rain gardens, creating needed habitat for pollinators, and encouraging a diversity of structure to maximize the utility of spaces for birds and other wildlife.

On April 29, 2015 the Nature Works Everywhere program and the NYC chapter hosted a garden build at public school PS811x in the Bronx. Event activities included building raised beds for pollinator habitat, composting and mulching. CSX, corporate sponsor of
In urban areas, arguably the most in need of adopting this goal, street medians can be replaced with native flowers, an abandoned lot can be managed for invasives or rebuilt as a neighborhood garden, or concrete backyards can be de-paved and replaced with vegetation. Increasing the area covered by plants on your site might be as simple as adding your favorite plants to a planter on your balcony, replacing a portion of lawn with a flowerbed, or taking on the stewardship of a community garden plot. Regardless of whether you add plants that yield garden-ripe, produce or you focus on native trees and shrubs–anything that draws you to green-up in the landscape is likely to have beneficial impacts.

The Brightside Organization, The Nature Conservancy, UPS and Brown-Forman partnered to plant 150 trees along West Broadway from 20th Street to the end at Shawnee Park in Louisville, Kentucky.
Wherever you live, whatever your passion regarding greening your surroundings, keep up the important work of transforming our landscapes. And, don’t forget to map your efforts in the Habitat Network.

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Explore these articles for extensive ideas about how to increase the amount of area covered by plants in your yard or community.
Flowerbeds
Native Trees and Shurbs
Edible Gardens
Evergreen Trees
Pollinator Garden
Bioswale
Rain Garden
Street Median
An Abandoned Lot
Structure

Source: Learn about Canaries and Budgies plus find more info about Budgie food and Canary Food. BIRDS and BIRDS NEWS All About Birds


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Irrigation Strategies for Trees, Shrubs, Gardens, and Lawn

by cnkguy
Irrigation Strategies for Trees, Shrubs, Gardens, and Lawn

Irrigation Conservation for Trees, Shrubs, Gardens, and Lawn
Jacob Johnston September 20, 2016
Birds D.I.Y. Design Advice Food Water irrigation
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How much water does your garden need? How often should it be watered? What is the best way for the irrigation be applied? In many cases it is easier to overwater your plants than to not provide enough. Over-watering can actually damage or kill your plants, wasting water, and energy, and leaving you with higher water bills. Efficient and effective watering can be achieved through simple monitoring and correct application. In addition to conserving water, proper irrigation can encourage deeper root growth and provide healthier, more drought-tolerant landscapes. Below, we explore some basic guidelines on conservation methods to properly water trees, shrubs, gardens, and lawns.

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Irrigation systems can waste water during transportation or through runoff, infiltration, or evaporation during delivery. Sprinklers, trench flooding, and many other types of water delivery systems can fail to deliver the right amount of water to the right spot. Ideally, water conservation requires secure delivery methods that apply irrigation directly to the root zone and adjusts for differences in seasonal watering requirements due to the specific species, the weather, and the plant’s maturity.

The Root zone is a critical area of plant’s vascular system. This is where new roots are growing underground to supply more water to the expanding shoots above. The canopy of a tree or shrub, or the vegetation of flowering plants, can block precipitation and sprinkled irrigation from reaching the roots directly underneath. The Root Zone extends beyond the drip line to help maximize the amount of water a plant can absorb. Providing water to this area, rather than directly at the base of the trunk, is a more efficient way to irrigate when conserving water.
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Water, water, every… where?
It is crucial to match the irrigation equipment with the size, shape, and type of landscape being watered. Watering sidewalks, landscaping structures, or the walls of buildings is wasteful and all too common with many irrigation systems that are too large or inaccurate for their setting. Watering plant foliage is also wasteful and generally unnecessary as it simply evaporates or increases the risk of fungal pathogens that can be difficult to control. Applying the correct amount of irrigation to the base of each plant is the overall goal in efficient irrigation. Fortunately, there are many options for catering a delivery system to the design and needs of the landscape being watered.

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Knowing when to water is another key to saving water. Plants have an optimal level of soil moisture at which their growth is most productive. Different species of plants, of course, will have different optimal soil moisture levels and providing this ideal environment will increase absorption by the plant, effectively conserving water and improving overall plant health. Proper timing of irrigation also increases absorption into the soil. Watering too often or too late may result in runoff due to wet, saturated soil or impenetrable, dry soil. There are a number of products available to monitor the moisture content in soil and doing so will give you more control over your water use as well as the health and productivity of the plants you grow. The soil moisture sensors, pictured above, provide constant readings at various soil depths.

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Penetration into the soil is also important for watering efficiency. You want moisture to reach the root zone for immediate use by the plant but also to penetrate below the roots to promote downward root growth. If your irrigation method does not provide enough penetration into the soil, the roots do not seek deeper, longer lasting sources of water and may become reliant on shallow, recurring waterings–putting the plant at risk during dry spells. You can use a soil probe to determine the depth of moisture in your soil. These can be purchased or simply made from any type of thin, pointed, metal rod or a long screwdriver. The probe will be easily inserted into moist soil and will meet resistance when hitting dry soil.

COMMON TYPES OF IRRIGATION
Common types of irrigation fall into three categories -Surface, Sprinkler, and Micro-irrigation.

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Trench/Flooding: Possibly the oldest and most globally used method of surface irrigation which uses the surface of the ground to deliver water, usually along furrows, trenches, or contained in raised borders. Although this is a simple and low-cost method of irrigation it can be the most wasteful as a large percent of the water is lost to runoff, evaporation, and infiltration into parts of the ground where plants can’t make use of it. Recapturing and reusing runoff, leveling fields, and applying lower doses in short surges are a few ways farmers are working-on reducing waste. On a smaller scale, this method is similar to using a hose to drench your garden. Using the techniques above, leveling the ground and applying water in short bursts, will help conserve water.

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Sprinkler: Another very popular form of irrigation, sprinklers deliver pressurized irrigation through a series of pumps, pipes, and nozzles. The benefits of sprinklers over surface irrigation includes improved conservation by allowing for greater control over the rate and amount of water delivery, limiting waste from runoff. Waste in a sprinkler systems comes primarily from evaporation and drift, up to 35% of the delivered water is essentially blowing away in the windopen_in_new. Proper timing, a lower nozzle height, and spray adjustments can help minimize this loss.

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Drip irrigation: Drip irrigation is the most used form of micro-irrigation and utilizes tubing and individual emitters to deliver water directly to the base of each plant. Emitters come in various forms and can regulate the rate of water released. Some are just a small hole located on the underside of the hose. This method of delivery requires a bit of set-up initially and some routine maintenance but is very efficient at transporting water and applying irrigation evenly and at a rate that can easily be absorbed into the soil, eliminating waste from runoff and evaporation.

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From watering a potted plant to irrigating a farm field, there are a few basic principles regarding the relationships between plants and their water use.

Plants will require more water during their growing season and less if they go dormant.
Proper root establishment will lead to more efficient water use.
Watering in the cool morning will aid in soil absorption, reduce evaporation, improve uptake and use by the plants, and allows the foliage time to dry.
Over watering can saturate the soil and reduce the oxygen available to the roots causing them to shut down and be unable to supply moisture to the plant.
Under watering will cause a plant to wilt, possibly collapsing the cell walls and causing permanent damage.
Regular, efficient watering will generally conserve more water in the long run than harsh restrictions that stress plants and may result in low production with similar irrigation.
Native plants, once established, will usually need less water as they are adapted to the local weather patterns. Additionally, they are a great choice when choosing resilient landscaping plants.
Here are additional watering tips to get the most hydration out of the least amount of irrigation.

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Garden beds
Whether you have vegetable gardens or ornamental flower beds you are likely to have a variety of watering requirements for different plantings. To save time and water, group your plantings with similar preferences for soil moisture. This usually coordinates well with shade and light requirements. Use of drip irrigation is best for vegetable gardens and flowerbeds because it delivers the right amount of water directly to the plants you want to water and none to the weeds you don’t want to grow. Run a separate line, each with its own shut-off valve, to each type of moisture area. A soaker hose is another form of drip irrigation that is easier to install and will still provide fairly precise and controlled irrigation.

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The use of a moisture sensor will help dictate the intervals between waterings and using a soil probe to check moisture depth will help ensure the duration of the watering period is sufficient to provide adequate penetration into the soil but not more than is necessary. Another simple technique is to watch for an “indicator” plant –one of the the first plants to lightly wilt as the garden becomes dry. As the seasons progress and plants mature, irrigation requirements will change and soil monitoring practices, such as these, can produce healthy and vibrant vegetation, save work, and are an important part of water conservation.

PRO-TIP
Weeds use water too. Remove them and mulch around your plants with shredded bark mulch, leaf mould, or newspaper covered with straw to keep weeds out and keep moisture in.

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Trees and shrubs
With deeper roots, taller shoots, and longer growing seasons, trees and shrubs have their own unique set of water requirements. In general, you will need to water less often but for longer periods of time to allow water to penetrate deep below the roots, encouraging the tree or shrub to grow deeper roots. In the spring and fall, evapotranspiration, the process whereby a plant’s water use transfers moisture from the ground to the atmosphere, is much lower than in the summer when hot, dry air increases this rate. If the roots can not reach a continuous source of water, signs of water stress will be evident and irrigation may be necessary. Ideally, watering trees and shrubs should take place right before water stress occurs. Use a soil probe during periods of drought to monitor soil moisture. Look for signs of water stress in the curling or wilting of leaves or, with coniferous trees, the browning and dropping of needles.

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Planting new trees and shrubs requires some diligent and attentive care. The root system will take time to become established into its new soil before it can be efficient at supplying enough moisture to the rest of the plant. Planting shrubs, trees, or any perennial in the Fall is ideal for successful establishment as the plant’s need for water is greatly reduced and the plant can use all of it’s resources to grow roots into the new soil. Be sure to check soil moisture often and water as needed, about once or twice a week, to maintain moisture at a depth of 18-20 inches. Efficient watering can be done through a slow steady trickle for 2-3 hours to penetrate deep into the soil without running off. A drip irrigation system or a treegator, or another type of watering bag, will apply irrigation at a consistent rate. Mulching around the base of the tree or shrubs will help provide an ideal environment for slow steady watering with little erosion or evaporation. Once established, however, new trees and shrubs will only need to be watered during periods of hot dry weather. Selecting native trees and shrubs will require less maintenance overall.

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Lawns
Our most irrigated crop–lawns tend to require an immense amount of irrigation, regularly applied, to maintain the smooth green expanse we’ve come to expect. Most lawns are nonnative grasses that are outside of their normal growing range and may require more inputs than the local environment provides. These include fertilizers, pesticides, and heavy watering. Efficient irrigation of lawn is critical to prevent runoff which can contaminate other local water sources, adding to polluted waterways, and creating hazards in natural environments. Efficient irrigation of lawn requires a system that delivers an equal and adequate amount of moisture to the entire turf area and not beyond. Waste or damage occurs when the system is not designed correctly for the space or is not properly maintained.
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Lawns are usually irrigated using a form of sprinkler system. Ideally, one that sprays water evenly across the surface of the lawn at a rate that allows penetration into the ground without runoff and a large enough droplet size that does not evaporate or blow away in the wind. Automated residential irrigation systems tend to result in higher water use than non-automated systems but the use of monitors like soil moisture sensors, rain gauges, and soil probes have been shown to improve efficiency of time based or scheduled irrigation regimes.

Whether you use a sophisticated automated system or simply water the lawn with a sprinkler on the end of a hose, the same concerns for water conservation can be present for either method:

Water less and during the cooler times of the day. This will reduce evaporation and improve absorption
Know how much irrigation you need, how much you are getting from rain, and how much you are putting on. Measure the amount of water in inches over time.
Maintain the system: clogs or leaks, misplaced or poorly aimed sprinkler heads, and interference from bigger plants, trees, or new landscape features create inefficiencies.
Lawns can be made from warm season or cold season grasses. Learn to expect the difference in seasonal needs. Grasses in their dormant period may appear brown but will not need water to survive. Remember brown is not bad.
To learn more about lawn options, explore our Native Lawn articles.

Cool season grasses are green in the spring and all through fall, whereas warm season grasses will green-up as summer temps turn the heat up.
Reducing the amount of water loss from transportation and delivery of your irrigation, providing the right amount of irrigation to the right spot, and using efficient scheduling of manual and automated irrigation systems will provide the opportunity to conserve water resources while maintaining quality landscape.

Source: Learn about Canaries and Budgies plus find more info about Budgie food and Canary Food. BIRDS and BIRDS NEWS All About Birds


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Regional Migration Forecast: 16-23 September 2016

by cnkguy
Regional Migration Forecast: 16-23 September 2016

Regional Migration Forecast: 16-23 September 2016

16 September, 2016
Broad-winged Hawk. Tim Lenz/Macaulay Library. eBird S31543492
Broad-winged Hawk. Tim Lenz/Macaulay Library. eBird S31543492

Continental Summary
Marginal and locally favorable migration conditions early in the period eventually yield to slightly more widespread favorable migration conditions, featuring Northern Shoveler, Eared Grebe, Belted Kingfisher, Orange-crowned Warbler, Townsend’s Warbler, Savannah Sparrow, and White-crowned Sparrow in the West and Bald Eagle, Chimney Swift, Northern Flicker, Merlin, Blue-headed Vireo, White-eyed Vireo, Magnolia Warbler, Pine Warbler, Common Yellowthroat, and Wilson’s Warbler in the East.

Play/Pause

▶◃▹↺-SPEED+
Arrows show wind speed and direction (arrow points in the direction to which wind is blowing) 100 m above ground level. Areas with southerly winds are colored red; northerly winds colored blue. Accumulated precipitation (in 6 hour intervals) is green, outlined by white. Broadly speaking, areas of the map in blue will experience conditions that are favorable for migration, and areas where blue and green (and red and blue) intersect and overlap may experience migrant concentrations and fallouts as migrants interact with precipitation.

We use data collected by eBird users help make more accurate forecasts. If you enjoy the predictions contained in these posts, please consider submitting your own bird sightings to eBird to even further improve the content. Every observation counts, whether it be a single bird at a feeder in your backyard, or an entire day spent in a national park. To get started with eBird, head on over to the site!

Additionally, please note that photographs and other digital media showing birds come from the Macaulay Library, which receives credit along with the photographer/observer in the media caption as part of a new initiative that allows public contribution, access and use of natural history media.

Need a review of our definitions for regions, species on the move, and migration amounts? Please visit this link.

Quick Links to Regions
Upper Midwest and NortheastBirdCast Upper Midwest and Northeast Region Gulf Coast and SoutheastBirdCast Upper Southeast Region
Great Plainsbirdcast_plains West
BirdCast West Region

Upper Midwest and Northeast
Generally unfavorable conditions for migration prevail across the region for the weekend, with the only likely areas experiencing movements to be in the Ohio River Valley and western Appalachians where locally moderate flights will occur. A pulse of more favorable conditions for moderate to heavy flights arrives by Monday and Tuesday nights in the Upper Midwest and then farther east, respectively. However, this pulse will not represent a significant change of air masses, and widespread migration is not likely to occur from this point through the remainder of the period. Rather, several areas of more favorable conditions, particularly in and around the Great Lakes and New England, will experience locally moderate to heavy flights to end the period.

Cape May Warbler. Jay McGowan/Macaulay Library. eBird S31576907
Cape May Warbler. Jay McGowan/Macaulay Library. eBird S31576907

Species on the Move
Beginning Arrivals What is this?
SPECIES
NOTICEABILITY
MIGRANTS BEGIN ARRIVING
RAPID MIGRANT INFLUX
PEAK
RAPID MIGRANT DEPARTURE
LAST MIGRANTS DEPART
Northern Harrier ** 8/2 10/9 10/21 11/2 11/13
Peregrine Falcon * 8/2 9/23 10/4 10/17 10/28
Northern Shoveler ** 8/9 10/12 11/8 After Nov 30 –
Green-winged Teal ** 8/13 10/11 10/24 After Nov 30 –
Palm Warbler *** 9/2 9/21 10/6 10/21 11/1
Pied-billed Grebe *** 9/4 10/11 10/31 11/20 After Nov 30
Northern Pintail ** 9/5 10/12 10/27 11/7 After Nov 30
Great Cormorant * 9/5 11/16 After Nov 30 – –
Marsh Wren * 9/7 9/19 9/30 10/17 10/29
Blue-headed Vireo *** 9/8 9/21 10/4 10/19 10/31
Eastern Phoebe ****! 9/9 9/18 9/30 10/18 11/3
Lincoln’s Sparrow *** 9/10 9/22 10/5 10/19 10/31
Indigo Bunting *** 9/10 9/16 9/25 10/12 10/21
American Pipit *** 9/10 9/22 10/24 11/11 11/25
Eastern Bluebird *** 9/12 9/27 10/18 11/12 After Nov 30
Savannah Sparrow *** 9/12 9/26 10/12 10/29 11/12
Dunlin ** 9/13 10/17 10/29 11/11 11/22
American Robin *** 9/13 9/24 10/13 11/8 After Nov 30
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker *** 9/16 9/25 10/5 10/16 10/24
Chipping Sparrow *** 9/16 10/2 10/12 10/29 11/9
Winter Wren *** 9/17 9/28 10/15 10/28 11/8
Eastern Meadowlark ** 9/17 10/2 10/16 10/30 11/11
Ruby-crowned Kinglet ****! 9/18 9/30 10/14 10/28 11/8
White-throated Sparrow ****! 9/18 9/30 10/18 10/31 11/12
Brown Creeper *** 9/19 9/29 10/14 10/24 11/5
Yellow-rumped Warbler ****! 9/19 9/29 10/12 10/26 11/7
Song Sparrow ****! 9/19 10/1 10/14 10/28 11/10
Rusty Blackbird *** 9/19 10/3 10/23 11/10 After Nov 30
Swamp Sparrow ****! 9/20 9/30 10/13 10/27 11/10
Golden-crowned Kinglet ****! 9/22 10/1 10/15 11/6 11/18
American Wigeon ** 9/23 10/8 10/28 11/10 11/29
American Black Duck *** 9/23 10/14 After Nov 30 – –
Horned Lark * 9/23 9/29 10/10 10/15 10/17
Eastern Towhee *** 9/23 9/30 10/9 10/23 11/3
White-crowned Sparrow ****! 9/23 10/2 10/15 10/27 11/6
Peaking Arrivals
Beginning Departures
SPECIES
NOTICEABILITY
MIGRANTS BEGIN ARRIVING
RAPID MIGRANT INFLUX
PEAK
RAPID MIGRANT DEPARTURE
LAST MIGRANTS DEPART
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron * – 8/2 8/6 10/10 10/28
Yellow-billed Cuckoo * – 8/2 8/6 9/28 10/12
Tree Swallow *** – 8/2 8/9 10/25 11/6
Snowy Egret ** – 8/2 8/11 10/17 10/31
Green Heron *** – 8/2 8/12 9/16 10/5
Great Egret *** – 8/2 8/13 10/22 11/5
Laughing Gull ** – 8/2 8/14 After Nov 30 –
Great Blue Heron *** – 8/2 8/15 10/20 After Nov 30
Osprey *** – 8/2 8/15 10/19 11/4
Forster’s Tern * – 8/2 8/16 9/26 After Nov 30
Cedar Waxwing *** – 8/2 8/17 9/25 After Nov 30
Chimney Swift *** 8/9 8/14 8/18 10/11 10/20
Greater Yellowlegs ** – 8/2 8/20 11/11 After Nov 30
Wood Duck ** – 8/2 8/21 11/2 11/22
Royal Tern * – 8/2 8/21 11/8 After Nov 30
Eastern Wood-Pewee *** 8/7 8/18 8/29 9/24 10/9
Ruby-throated Hummingbird *** – 8/2 8/31 9/21 10/3
Sanderling ** – 8/2 9/2 9/22 10/4
Bobolink ** 8/2 8/19 9/2 9/16 10/19
Least Flycatcher ** 8/11 8/21 9/3 9/21 10/4
Warbling Vireo *** 8/19 8/27 9/5 9/17 9/25
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher * 8/13 8/24 9/6 9/20 9/30
Blue-winged Teal ** 8/2 8/19 9/7 10/22 11/5
Red-eyed Vireo *** 8/15 8/24 9/7 9/28 10/11
Veery *** 8/19 8/28 9/7 9/19 9/28
Golden-winged Warbler * 8/18 8/28 9/8 9/20 9/29
Blackburnian Warbler *** 8/12 8/23 9/8 9/26 10/7
American Golden-Plover * 8/16 8/26 9/9 9/22 10/16
Yellow-throated Vireo *** 8/21 8/29 9/9 9/22 10/2
Chestnut-sided Warbler *** 8/14 8/26 9/9 9/25 10/6
White-eyed Vireo *** 8/23 8/31 9/10 9/23 10/3
Northern Waterthrush *** 8/2 8/31 9/10 9/24 10/9
Hooded Warbler * 8/23 8/31 9/10 9/24 10/5
Prairie Warbler * – 8/2 9/10 9/25 10/7
Red-headed Woodpecker * 8/23 9/1 9/11 9/27 10/13
Wilson’s Warbler *** 8/22 8/31 9/11 9/23 10/2
Wood Thrush ** 8/22 8/28 9/12 10/1 10/12
Ovenbird *** 8/15 8/29 9/12 9/30 10/12
American Redstart *** 8/20 8/31 9/12 9/26 10/8
Black-and-white Warbler *** 8/2 8/29 9/13 9/30 10/11
House Wren *** 8/30 9/5 9/15 10/7 10/21
Tennessee Warbler *** 8/17 8/29 9/15 10/4 10/19
Bay-breasted Warbler *** 8/26 9/4 9/15 9/28 10/8
Scarlet Tanager *** 8/24 9/3 9/15 10/1 10/12
Philadelphia Vireo *** 8/27 9/5 9/16 9/28 10/7
Magnolia Warbler *** 8/20 9/1 9/16 10/2 10/13
Bald Eagle ** 8/2 9/5 9/17 9/26 10/1
Swainson’s Thrush *** 8/27 9/5 9/17 9/30 10/14
Common Yellowthroat *** 8/24 9/2 9/17 10/9 10/23
Summer Tanager * 8/27 9/7 9/17 10/2 10/12
Rose-breasted Grosbeak *** 8/30 9/7 9/17 9/30 10/9
Broad-winged Hawk *** 8/31 9/8 9/18 9/29 10/7
Gray Catbird *** 8/28 9/8 9/18 10/9 10/22
Cape May Warbler *** 8/25 9/4 9/18 10/2 10/15
Turkey Vulture *** 8/28 9/6 9/19 10/27 After Nov 30
Belted Kingfisher *** – 8/2 9/19 10/16 10/29
Merlin * 8/26 9/4 9/20 10/26 11/6
Nashville Warbler *** 8/23 9/3 9/20 10/10 10/22
Northern Parula *** 8/28 9/7 9/20 10/4 10/15
Red-shouldered Hawk * 8/26 9/5 9/21 11/10 11/19
Brown Thrasher *** 8/30 9/9 9/21 10/4 10/17
Pine Warbler ** 8/23 9/4 9/21 10/12 10/26
Black-throated Green Warbler *** 8/24 9/7 9/21 10/6 10/17
Blackpoll Warbler *** 8/28 9/7 9/22 10/8 10/23
Gray-cheeked Thrush ** 9/2 9/11 9/23 10/5 10/14
Killdeer *** – – Before Aug 1 10/25 11/24
Whimbrel * – – Before Aug 1 9/19 10/3
Ending Departures

Gulf Coast and Southeast
Aside from locally moderate to heavy movements in the southeastern coastal plain on the weekend, most of the region begins this period with unfavorable migration conditions. But Monday and Tuesday nights conditions ameliorate from the central Appalachians through the lower Mississippi River Valley, where moderate to heavy flights will occur. The remainder of the period sees increasingly unfavorable conditions returning, with isolated areas of light to moderate migration primarily in more eastern reaches of the region.

Chimney Swift. Marie C./Macaulay Library. eBird S31498227
Chimney Swift. Marie C./Macaulay Library. eBird S31498227

Beginning Arrivals What is this?
Peaking Arrivals
Beginning Departures
Ending Departures

Great Plains
Scattered moderate to heavy movements will punctuate the first half of the period in the northern Plains, while the central and southern Plains remain generally much less active. The second half of the period will see several disturbances pass through the region, facilitating brief pulses of moderate to heavy flights in the northern Plains, again. But these disturbances will not be sufficiently strong or extensive to create the widespread conditions the spawn large, and regional, flights. Birders should watch the distribution of precipitation and migration later in the period, as the passing disturbances may have localized fallouts and concentrations in the northern Plains. Forecast conditions look particularly good for listening to flight calls, and birders should consider listening and recording Wednesday to Friday nights in areas where rain is not falling, where cloud ceilings are decreased, and particularly in areas that meet both of these conditions and have significant artificial lighting.

Clay-colored Sparrow. Jacob Drucker/Macaulay Library. eBird S31555727
Clay-colored Sparrow. Jacob Drucker/Macaulay Library. eBird S31555727

Species on the Move
Beginning Arrivals What is this?
Peaking Arrivals
Beginning Departures
Ending Departures

West
Light to moderate flights will be apparent across the southern half of the region this weekend. The beginning of the work week sees more locally favorable conditions and similarly local distributions of light to moderate flights. Tuesday and Wednesday nights bring slightly more extensive favorable migration conditions, particularly in the Pacific Northwest and some areas of the northern Rockies.

White-crowned Sparrow. Marsha Schorer/Macaulay Library. eBird S31521673
White-crowned Sparrow. Marsha Schorer/Macaulay Library. eBird S31521673

Species on the Move
Beginning Arrivals What is this?
Peaking Arrivals
Beginning Departures
Ending Departures
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Farnsworth and Van Doren

Source: Learn about Canaries and Budgies plus find more info about Budgie food and Canary Food. BIRDS and BIRDS NEWS All About Birds


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